Read published research on what makes housing accessible to everyday destinations in Southern California?

Publication:

Kane, Kevin, John R. Hipp, and Jae Hong Kim. (2017). “Analyzing accessibility using parcel data: Is there still an access-space trade-off in Long Beach, California? The Professional Geographer 69:3, 486-503.

Abstract:

This article analyzes the impact of changing housing and neighborhood characteristics on the accessibility of neighborhood businesses using Long Beach, California, as a case study. Although advocates of smart growth and New Urbanism encourage land use mixing, aggregate-level analysis can be too coarse to pick up on fine-grained aspects of urban streetscapes. This study uses assessor parcel records and a point-based business establishment data set to analyze city-wide patterns of accessibility from individual dwelling units to thirty-one types of neighborhood businesses, including grocery stores, service shops, drug stores, doctor’s offices, and banks. Regression results compare parcel-level and neighborhood-level drivers of accessibility between 2006 and 2015 to gauge the aggregated effect of recent economic, demographic, and built environment changes on this aspect of urban spatial structure. Larger homes in older, multiunit buildings and higher income neighborhoods show substantial increases in accessibility to most establishment types, suggesting a trend toward both greater accessibility and larger dwelling units—despite the traditional trade-off between access and space. Although gradual increases in home and business density increased overall accessibility over this period, weaker neighborhood-level results indicate that this trend is less pronounced in high-poverty and non-white areas.

Quarterly Report on Jobs-Housing Balance in Egohoods in Southern California

WebMapHousingEgoA challenge for any region is matching the location of where residents live and where jobs are located.  On the one hand, residents typically prefer not to be too close to industrial or commercial sites. On the other hand, residents typically do not want to be too far from jobs, as this implies longer commute times.  And longer commutes overall aggregate to an overtaxing of the transportation system.  Thus, the “balance” between the location of jobs and housing is of considerable interest to policy makers and scholars. In this Report, we study the relationship between the location of jobs and the residential location of potential workers.  We distinguish between two related concepts.  First, jobs-housing ratios capture locations that are particularly job-rich versus locations that are job deserts.  Second, jobs-housing imbalance captures locations that have a big difference between the number of jobs and workers.

Explore this report using our web mapping application.

Or, you can download the full report here.

Read the report on Jobs-Housing Balance in Egohoods in Southern California

A challenge for any region is matching the location of where residents live and where jobs are located.  On the one hand, residents typically prefer not to be too close to industrial or commercial sites.  On the other hand, residents typically do not want to be too far from jobs, as this implies longer commute times. This report highlights trends in jobs-housing balance in Southern California since 2002 and offers some methodological improvements in analyzing this indicator of urban sustainability.

Download the full report here.

 

Explore the web app on Jobs-Housing Balance in Egohoods in Southern California

WebMapHousingEgoClick here for a web mapping application that allows you to explore job-housing balance at the neighborhood level using the 2.5 mile area around each block.  This application corresponds to MFI’s Quarterly Report “Jobs-Housing Balance in Egohoods in Southern California.”

Quarterly Report on Neighborhood Mixing and Economic Dynamism

We typically think of neighborhoods as fairly homogeneous areas within cities.  Nonetheless, some neighborhoods are highly mixed and others are not based on things like income, racial composition, age, land use, and the type of housing they contain.  We analyze mixing across these dimensions in Southern California, then ask what are the consequences of mixing for economic dynamism in neighborhoods.  Explore this report using our web mapping application, or download the full report here.

 

Quarterly Report on Detecting Job Density Over Time

This report examines how employment subcenters have been evolving since the 1990s in terms of their changing composition and spatial locations. Find out more about the research through the video, report, and apps.

 

Quarterly Report on Understanding Business Churning Dynamics and their Spatial Variation

This report analyzes business churning at the neighborhood level across Southern California with an eye toward socio-demographic characteristics and local measures of well-being. Find out more about the research through the report and app.

Read the report on Neighborhood Mixing and Economic Dynamism

We typically think of neighborhoods as fairly homogeneous areas within cities.  Nonetheless, some neighborhoods are highly mixed and others are not based on things like income, racial composition, age, land use, and the type of housing they contain.  We analyze mixing across these dimensions in Southern California, then ask what are the consequences of mixing for economic dynamism in neighborhoods.  Explore this report using our web mapping application, or download the full report.

 

Explore the web app on Neighborhood Mixing and Economic Dynamism

Click here for a web mapping application that allows you to explore several dimensions of mixing across Southern California including income, age, racial composition, housing characteristics, and land use.  This application corresponds to MFI’s Quarterly Report “Understanding Mixing in
Neighborhoods and its Relationship with Economic Dynamism.”

Watch the video on Detecting Job Density Over Time