Read the report on Understanding Business Churning Dynamics and their Spatial Variation

While job growth in a region is crucially important, the dynamic of business creation and business closure can reveal a lot about a region’s economy.  Does churning lead to “creative destruction” and a more efficient economy in the long-run or might it have negative consequences, especially in certain neighborhoods?  This report analyzes business churning at the neighborhood level across Southern California with an eye toward socio-demographic characteristics and local measures of well-being. Download the full report here.

Explore the web app on Understanding Business Churning Dynamics and their Spatial Variation

churn_appClick here for a web mapping application that allows you to explore the relationships between business churning, job growth, and clustering across Southern California.

Read published research on Understanding Business Churning Dynamics and their Spatial Variation

Peer-reviewed research based on the analyses in this Report will be published soon. Please return at a later date.

Understanding Neighborhoods – Featuring Professor John Hipp

Measuring the accessibility of neighborhood businesses amidst evolving residential development patterns

DrKaneMFISpring2016 (4 of 8)Dr. Kevin Kane evaluates the impact of building-level and neighborhood-level characteristics on the accessibility of neighborhood businesses to housing units using Long Beach, California as a case study.  While advocates of smart growth and New Urbanism encourage both mixed-use developments and land use mixing, analysis at the aggregated level can be too coarse to pick up on the fine-grained characteristics of urban streetscapes.

Second Regional Progress Report

mfi_cover_imageThe 2014 Southern California Regional Progress Report was prepared by researchers with the School of Social Ecology’s Metropolitan Futures Initiative, which aims to build a base of knowledge to guide policymakers in improving the overall quality of life in the Southland.  It is the second installment in a biennial series of Regional Progress Reports.

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First Regional Progress Report

mfi_photos_-_la_day_250wThe inaugural Southern California Regional Progress Report was prepared by researchers with the School of Social Ecology’s Metropolitan Futures Initiative, which aims to build a base of knowledge to guide policymakers in improving the overall quality of life in the Southland.

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Research Reports and Policy Briefs

 

  • Land Use and Vehicle Miles of Travel in the Climate Change Debate: Getting Smarter than Your Average Bear. 
    by Marlon G. Boarnet, Douglas Houston, Gavin Ferguson, and Steven Spears
  • Affordable Housing in Transportation Corridors – Built Environment, Accessibility, and Air Pollution Implications of Near-Roadway Residential Locations.  Principal Investigator: Douglas Houston, UCI Policy, Planning and Design; Co- Principal Investigator: Jun Wu, UCI Epidemiology & Program in Public Health.   Abstract is here.

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Peer-reviewed Research

  • Hipp, John R. and Amrita Singh. (2014). “Changing Neighborhood Determinants of Housing Price Trends in Southern California, 1960-2009.” City & Community. 13(3): 254-274. [This project studies whether the relationship between certain characteristics of neighborhoods and home values have changed over a 50 year period in Southern California.  An important finding is that the negative relationship with racial/ethnic minorities has decreased substantially in recent decades.]

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Regional Dialogues in Governance

 

  • Regional Leadership in Air Quality Program – Marlon Boarnet (Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design) and Lindell Marsh (attorney and lecturer in Planning, Policy, and Design) convened a series of meetings with leaders of key regional agencies and stakeholders in 2009 that produced a common understanding of the region’s land use – air quality – transportation – energy infrastructure challenges.  This effort is supported by SCAG, leading planning firms, UC Irvine, and Cal State University San Bernardino.
  • Community Scholars Program – Supports the capacity building and organizational development of non-profits through applied “place-based” research. Recent Community Scholar projects include the development of a “foreclosure counseling” program for the Neighborhood Housing Services of Orange County and the evaluation of a community building initiative by the Office of Orange County Human Relations (OCHR). The latter resulted in OCHR securing a $225,000 continuation grant from the St. Joseph Health System.