Quarterly Report on Inequality and Segregation in Southern California

This Report studies the changes in inequality and racial composition and segregation in each of the counties in the Southern California region over a 50 year period.  Many of the graphs display changes over a 50 year period since 1970, and some reach back even further in time.  Some key results of interest include:

  • Orange County has gone from the least racial/ethnic mixing in 1970 to the most by 2018.
  • Los Angeles County has the highest level of income inequality.
  • Ventura County has the lowest level of income inequality.
  • After rising in earlier years, income inequality in Orange County has held relatively steady since 2000.
  • Income segregation is higher in Southern California counties compared to average U.S. large counties.
  • Income segregation rose sharply in the 2000s, though it has fallen a bit since 2010.
  • Incomes are rising fastest in San Diego County since 2000. Whereas the median income in San Diego County was 10% higher than the average large county in the U.S. in 2000, it was 30% higher by 2018.
  • Incomes in Los Angeles County went from equal to the average large county in the U.S. in 2000 to 20% higher by 2018.
  • Median rents and home values are rising faster in Southern California since 2000.
  • In 2018, whereas the median income in Orange County is 50% higher than the average large county in the U.S., median rents are 90% higher, and median home values are 210% higher.

 

The maps here show which neighborhoods have experienced the largest increase in adjusted home values since 1970 for each of the counties.

 

 

 

Read the Report on Inequality and Segregation in Southern California

This Report studies the changes in inequality and racial composition and segregation in each of the counties in the Southern California region over a 50 year period.  Many of the graphs display changes over a 50 year period since 1970, and some reach back even further in time.  Some key results of interest include:

  • Orange County has gone from the least racial/ethnic mixing in 1970 to the most by 2018.
  • Los Angeles County has the highest level of income inequality.
  • Ventura County has the lowest level of income inequality.
  • After rising in earlier years, income inequality in Orange County has held relatively steady since 2000.
  • Income segregation is higher in Southern California counties compared to average U.S. large counties.
  • Income segregation rose sharply in the 2000s, though it has fallen a bit since 2010.
  • Incomes are rising fastest in San Diego County since 2000. Whereas the median income in San Diego County was 10% higher than the average large county in the U.S. in 2000, it was 30% higher by 2018.
  • Incomes in Los Angeles County went from equal to the average large county in the U.S. in 2000 to 20% higher by 2018.
  • Median rents and home values are rising faster in Southern California since 2000.
  • In 2018, whereas the median income in Orange County is 50% higher than the average large county in the U.S., median rents are 90% higher, and median home values are 210% higher.

 

 

Download the full report here.

 

The maps here show which neighborhoods have experienced the largest increase in adjusted home values since 1970 for each of the counties.

 

 

 

 

Appendices with the additional maps for each county separately from the Report are here:

Maps for Los Angeles County.

Maps for Orange County.

Maps for Riverside County.

Maps for San Bernardino County.

Maps for San Diego County.

Maps for Ventura County.

 

Read the Report on Rising Inequality and Neighborhood Mixing in Metropolitan Areas

This Report provides new insights into some of the spatial relationships involved in both neighborhood mixing and regional inequality through an investigation of 381 metropolitan areas in the U.S. in 2010 using advanced measurement strategies and analysis methods.

The study uses a novel neighborhood unit—egohoods—to measure the degree of mixing that occurs within the neighborhoods of these metropolitan areas.  It measures mixing based on income, occupational status, and educational achievement.

We compare the level of mixing on these three dimensions across all metropolitan areas in the U.S. in 2010.

Below is a map showing the level of income mixing in neighborhoods for each of the metropolitan areas in the U.S.

Download the full report here.

 

Quarterly Report on Rising Inequality and Neighborhood Mixing in Metropolitan Areas

This Report provides new insights into some of the spatial relationships involved in both neighborhood mixing and regional inequality through an investigation of 381 metropolitan areas in the U.S. in 2010 using advanced measurement strategies and analysis methods.

The study uses a novel neighborhood unit—egohoods—to measure the degree of mixing that occurs within the neighborhoods of these metropolitan areas.  It measures mixing based on income, occupational status, and educational achievement.

We compare the level of mixing on these three dimensions across all metropolitan areas in the U.S. in 2010.

Below is a map showing the level of income mixing in neighborhoods for each of the metropolitan areas in the U.S.

Quarterly Report on Typology of Southern California neighborhood home values from 1960-2015

For many households, a home is their largest investment. In addition, for households much of their lives are lived within the neighborhood that contains their house. For these reasons, and many others,
there is naturally an interest in understanding the pattern of home value appreciation, or depreciation, across neighborhoods over time. We explore the change in home values across Southern California neighborhoods over a 50 year period.

For our analyses, we use data from 5 U.S. Censuses: 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000; as well as the American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year data in 2005-09 and 2011-15. We adopt a statistical approach that allows us to create a typology of how neighborhoods change based on their home values over time. Our analyses yielded 16 different classes of neighborhoods. In this Report, we will describe these classes of neighborhoods based on their demographic composition over this period, and where they are located spatially.

Download the full report here.

Quarterly Report on Race and Income Composition of Southern California Neighborhoods

The neighborhoods we live in are important, as they are the locations of our daily activities. Nonetheless, there are differences in the characteristics of neighborhoods across any city or region. Our goal in this Report is to better understand the differences between neighborhoods. In particular, we are interested in understanding the differences in neighborhoods based on the socio-economic status of the household, as well as the racial/ethnic composition of the household. This better understanding can shed light on any possible inequalities that may exist and require policy attention. Furthermore, by taking a long-term view to this question—by studying the region from 1980 to present—we are able to provide insight on what types of changes have occurred in these neighborhoods over this period of time.

Download the full report here (.pdf)

 

Quarterly Report on Business Relocations in Southern California

Business recruitment has long been one of the most popular strategies for state and local economic development in the US, but little is understood about the precise physical location of business moves, such as the surrounding neighborhoods and how far away a firm relocates.  This Report takes a spatially precise approach toward analyzing business relocations in the seven-county Southern California region from 1997-2014. We analyze moves within cities and across city boundaries, as well as the characteristics of the neighborhoods which businesses leave – and move to.

Download the full report here (.pdf).  Register for the webinar covering this report on 8/15/2017 here.

Read the report on Jobs-Housing Balance in Egohoods in Southern California

A challenge for any region is matching the location of where residents live and where jobs are located.  On the one hand, residents typically prefer not to be too close to industrial or commercial sites.  On the other hand, residents typically do not want to be too far from jobs, as this implies longer commute times. This report highlights trends in jobs-housing balance in Southern California since 2002 and offers some methodological improvements in analyzing this indicator of urban sustainability.

Download the full report here.

 

Read the report on Neighborhood Mixing and Economic Dynamism

We typically think of neighborhoods as fairly homogeneous areas within cities.  Nonetheless, some neighborhoods are highly mixed and others are not based on things like income, racial composition, age, land use, and the type of housing they contain.  We analyze mixing across these dimensions in Southern California, then ask what are the consequences of mixing for economic dynamism in neighborhoods.  Explore this report using our web mapping application, or download the full report.

 

Read the report on Detecting Job Density Over Time

The Los Angeles region is a classic example of a “polycentric metropolis” that is characterized by several centers of job density instead of a single, dominant downtown.  This report examines how employment subcenters have been evolving since the 1990s in terms of their changing composition and spatial locations. Download the full report here.